Posts Tagged Pioneer Press

Eli’s Cheesecake/Wright College Farmer’s Market Featured in the Pioneer Press

 

Photo by Jason Brown/Staff Photographer
Irmgard Reile of Chicago purchases green beans from Nichols Farm & Orchard, one of the
purveyors at the weekly farmers market at Eli’s Cheesecake World.

Farmer’s Market offers more than fruit,
veggies
BY WYNN KOEBEL FOSTER | STAFF WRITER
wfoster@pioneerlocal.com

All of the traditional items customers might expect to find at a farmer’s market are present and accounted for at the Eli’s/Wright College markets on Thursdays at Eli’s Cheesecake World, 6701 W. Forest Preserve Drive, in Chicago.

Nichols Farm and Orchard, in Marengo, where the motto is “Variety is our specialty,” brings dozens of kinds of potatoes, peppers, corn, lettuce, beets, kale, Swiss chard, peas, broccoli, rhubarb, strawberries, flowers, herbs and more to the weekly event.Owner Peter Klein travels to the market from his 81-acre farm near South Haven, Mich., each week with his wares.

“This week, we have peaches, cherries, raspberries, blueberries, salsa, apple butter and pear butter,” he said. “By the end of the season, we’ll have a lot of different things to sell.
We’re principally a tree-fruit operation, with more than 6,000 trees and over 75 varieties.”

But this summer, shoppers will find a lot more than fruit and vegetables at the Eli’s/Wright College markets.

Mickey Jurgensen and Ralph Perri, owners of Woofs and Whiskers, brought a large variety of their company’s pet products to the market. For $3.75, customers could buy Kitty Kaviar; for $3.50, Kitty Kisses. They also had toys, collars, leashes, food products, bones and non-allergic grooming supplies for dogs and cats.

Nearby, representatives of Ten Thousand Villages, a nonprofit program of the North American Mennonite and Brethren in Christ churches, which markets products made by artisans in 32 nations, showcased their wares. Their mission statement says, in part: “Ten Thousand Villages works with artisans who would otherwise be unemployed or underemployed. This income helps pay for food, education, health care or housing.”

On July 13, Ten Thousand Villages brought jewelry, puzzles, coffees, teas, bean soup mixes, marinades, salsa mixes, baskets, tableware, candles, candleholders, cookbooks and chutney to the market.

Borders had some light reading materials for sale, including children’s books and puzzle books for all ages.

Delightful Pastries, 5927 W. Lawrence Ave., in Chicago, had a wide variety of the bakery’s all-natural products to sell, such as breads, cakes, sweet rolls, croissants, strudels and cookies.

Employees of Stivers Coffee, 2215 S. Union St., in Chicago, offered customers samples of their coffees — frozen in cubes, which melted into iced coffee as they shopped. The firm custom-roasts and flavors exotic coffees from South and Central America, Africa, Indonesia, Hawaii and Jamaica. Their flavored coffees include Southern Pecan, Banana Chip,
Egg Nog, Raspberry n’Creme and Peanut Butter Truffle.

“We have decafs and teas, too,” they said.

Fred Spritzer, formerly of Chicago’s Jefferson Park community, presided over Eli’s grills. Each market features freshly prepared luncheon choices for shoppers. On July 13, Spritzer offered barbecued pulled pork sandwiches on potato buns for $5 and pastrami with honey mustard on marble rye for $6. Both sandwiches included the trimmings. Shoppers enjoyed their lunches under the canopies set up to the east of Eli’s, while they watched a flower arranging demonstration by Robert Neri, an instructor at Wright College.

“When he’s through, we’ll give away the arrangements,” said Eli’s Mary Gale.

Each week, the Eli’s/Wright College farmers markets will feature special activities and entertainment for shoppers. For further information, call (773) 736-3417 or see www.elicheesecake.com.

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Slice of Fun at Eli’s Cheesecake Festival featured in the Pioneer Press

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Ridgewood High School Art Club lauded in Pioneer Press for work decorating windows for the holidays at Eli’s Cheesecake World and New Horizons Center

Young artists decorate Eli’s and New
Horizon
BY WYNN KOEBEL FOSTER
STAFF WRITER
All signs at Eli’s
Cheesecake World, 6701 W. Forest Preserve Drive, in Chicago, point to a merry
holiday season. Even the fork-and-cake-server weathervane on the back of Moovin’
Eli’s, the corporate cow once featured in Chicago’s Cows on Parade, indicates
nothing but smooth conditions ahead.
Moovin’ Eli’s is dressed for the
holidays – her neck draped in a silver garland tied with a red velvet bow. A
piece of the cherry cheesecake on her back is missing. It dangles from a welded,
garlanded line of forks in front of her nose and out of her reach. But the
holidays are no time for pessimism. Moovin’ Eli’s is also sporting four speedy
in-line skates.
Since August, Eli’s bakers have been working at full
capacity, churning out 20,000 cakes a day.
“We normally produce 100 different
varieties,” said Kari Miller, cafe manager. “During the Christmas season, we add
white chocolate peppermint, egg nog and candy cane to our repertoire. For
Thanksgiving, we have pumpkin, pumpkin mousse and pumpkin praline cakes.
“And
for New Year’s Eve, we’ll have a champagne mousse cake.”
Even the windows at
Eli’s are festive, thanks to the efforts of Art Club members at Ridgewood High
School, in Norridge.
“This is the second year we’ve done Christmas windows
here,” said Art Club President John Kercheval, 17, of Norridge. “We were at
Eli’s for Easter, Halloween and Thanksgiving, too.”
The students sketched
their ideas in wax crayons on the windows first. Then they painted their
creations with washable poster paints.
“I haven’t asked her,” Kercheval
admitted, chewing on the end of a brush, “but I already know my mom wouldn’t let
me do this at home.”
Maggi Bojko, 14, of Norridge, and Sylvia Dreg, 14, of
Harwood Heights, concentrated on snow – falling snow, snowflakes and a snowman.
In the corner of their window, they placed a fir tree, too.
Kercheval dodged
Moovin’ Eli’s horns to paint candy canes and a gingerbread house on his window.
Next to him, two girls painted golden bells and a herald angel with a trumpet,
along with a garland, a Christmas stocking and stacks of gift-wrapped
packages.
Rich Serrano, 15, of Norridge, also risked being impaled by Moovin’
Eli’s to encircle his window with an evergreen wreath studded with Christmas
lights. As he worked, he listened to MVD Bayne music on his earphones for
inspiration – metal, of course.
“I got the wreath idea from my mother,” he
said.
Kercheval added Santa, his sleigh and some racing reindeer to his
window. As a finishing flourish, he tossed in a snowball fight, too.
Next to
Kercheval and Serrano, 16-year-old Gabriella Marti, of Norridge, looked ahead,
creating a New Year’s Eve window with fireworks, champagne glasses and
more.
While some students decorated Eli’s, Art Club sponsor Sara Machaj took
another group to work on the windows at New Horizons Center, 4255 N. Oak Park
Ave., Chicago, with the exuberant assistance of a number of the center’s
residents.
When they finished at New Horizons, the students came back to
Eli’s for pizza, compliments of Eli’s.
“I really enjoy this,” said Marc
Schulman, president of Eli’s. “Ridgewood is a great school. They’re always a
pleasure to work with.”
Eli’s Cheesecake World can be reached at www.elicheesecake.com or at (773)
736-3417.

 

Decking halls and windows

BY WYNN KOEBEL
F
OSTER
STAFF WRITER

All signs at Eli’s Cheesecake World, 6701 W. Forest Preserve Drive, point to
a merry holiday season. Even the fork-and-cake-server weathervane on the back of
Moovin’ Eli’s, the corporate cow once featured in Chicago’s Cows on Parade,
indicates nothing but smooth conditions ahead.

Moovin’ Eli’s is dressed for the holidays – her neck draped in a silver
garland tied with a red velvet bow. A piece of the cherry cheesecake on her back
is missing. It dangles from a welded, garlanded line of forks in front of her
nose and out of her reach. But the holidays are no time for pessimism. Moovin’
Eli’s is also sporting four speedy in-line skates.

Since August, Eli’s bakers have been working at full capacity, churning out
20,000 cakes a day.

“We normally produce 100 different varieties,” said Kari Miller, cafe
manager. “During the Christmas season, we add white chocolate peppermint, egg
nog and candy cane to our repertoire. For Thanksgiving, we have pumpkin, pumpkin
mousse and pumpkin praline cakes.

“And for New Year’s Eve, we’ll have a champagne mousse cake.”

Even the windows at Eli’s are festive, thanks to the efforts of Art Club
members at Ridgewood High School, in Norridge.

“This is the second year we’ve done Christmas windows here,” said Art Club
President John Kercheval, 17, of Norridge. “We were at Eli’s for Easter,
Halloween and Thanksgiving, too.”

The students sketched their ideas in wax crayons on the windows first. Then
they painted their creations with washable poster paints.

“I haven’t asked her,” Kercheval admitted, chewing on the end of a brush,
“but I already know my mom wouldn’t let me do this at home.”

Maggi Bojko, 14, of Norridge, and Sylvia Dreg, 14, of Harwood Heights,
concentrated on snow – falling snow, snowflakes and a snowman. In the corner of
their window, they placed a fir tree, too.

Kercheval dodged Moovin’ Eli’s horns to paint candy canes and a gingerbread
house on his window. Next to him, two girls painted golden bells and a herald
angel with a trumpet, along with a garland, a Christmas stocking and stacks of
gift-wrapped packages.

Rich Serrano, 15, of Norridge, also risked being impaled by Moovin’ Eli’s to
encircle his window with an evergreen wreath studded with Christmas lights. As
he worked, he listened to MVD Bayne music on his earphones for inspiration -
metal, of course.

“I got the wreath idea from my mother,” he said.

Kercheval added Santa, his sleigh and some racing reindeer to his window. As
a finishing flourish, he tossed in a snowball fight, too.

Next to Kercheval and Serrano, 16-year-old Gabriella Marti, of Norridge,
looked ahead, creating a New Year’s Eve window with fireworks, champagne glasses
and more.

While some students decorated Eli’s, Art Club sponsor Sara Machaj took
another group to work on the windows at New Horizons Center, 4255 N. Oak Park
Ave., Chicago, with the exuberant assistance of a number of the center’s
residents.

When they finished at New Horizons, the students came back to Eli’s for
pizza, compliments of Eli’s.

“I really enjoy this,” said Marc Schulman, president of Eli’s. “Ridgewood is
a great school. They’re always a pleasure to work with.”

Eli’s Cheesecake World can be reached at www.elicheesecake.com or at (773) 736-3417.

The members of the Art Club at Ridgewood High School

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